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www.theycallmeHER.com
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“Morg is that creepster that camps out by the water fountain and secretly snaps photos of her prey." - Kenya

Haha… Kenya is right. Imma gully creepa. 
I shall call this…
Water Fountain, July 2010 by Morgan James.
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Riding Free from James. on Vimeo.

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Saw Moonrise Kingdom recently and can’t shake it. It was that good. It’s every Wes Anderson quirk and wry sensibility. And leaves you feeling really swell. Really. 
Also, Suzy Bishop’s intensity and mannerisms are a dead wringer for Lana Del Rey. For serious. 
"What kind of bird are you?"
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It’s Independence Day.  Salut to Frank Ocean and Anderson Cooper. Freeing themselves of societal constructs and suppressive rigidity and just living… being. 
Frank Ocean admits his ‘first love’ was a man.
Anderson Cooper “The fact is, I’m gay.”
C’est le quatrième.
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Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
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Photo: St. Vincent / Annie Clark performing at Bonnaroo over the weekend. 

In her rapid ascent from backing-band member to center-stage guitar shredder, Clark has also dabbled as a fashion muse on the side. She’s modeled for Madewell and performed at a Rachel Comey New York Fashion Week show. Her interest in fashion informs her striking onstage style. “Touring clothes have to be functional and somewhat architectural,” Clark explains. “They have to have a little bit of pop to them, so people can see them from far away. But then they also have to be durable enough, because depending on the show, they will be sweated in, and there will potentially be blood on them. And then they also have to be able to fit in a suitcase. I’ve been wearing leather shorts and alternating tops [on tour]. I’ve been going out into the crowd quite a bit and stage diving — so the shorts are helpful. It’s hard to wear dresses because they tend to ride up.” - Paper Mag
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Two years ago Louis Vuitton celebrated 150 years providing exquisite luggage to the moneyed. I’m not the latter, but I wants the aforementioned. 
Presently, Louis Vuitton tops Millward Brown’s annual BrandZ report as the highest placed luxury brand, climbing 5 places to 21 and growing value by 7% to $25.9bn (£16.4bn).  Hermès  was the highest climber in the list, up 39 spots and growing value by 61% to $19.1bn (£12bn). (Marketing Week)
Two years ago Louis Vuitton celebrated 150 years providing exquisite luggage to the moneyed. I’m not the latter, but I wants the aforementioned. 
Presently, Louis Vuitton tops Millward Brown’s annual BrandZ report as the highest placed luxury brand, climbing 5 places to 21 and growing value by 7% to $25.9bn (£16.4bn).  Hermès  was the highest climber in the list, up 39 spots and growing value by 61% to $19.1bn (£12bn). (Marketing Week)
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The Transformation of Tiresias
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$2 Billion? | Charge it to the game J.P.
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