t h e y
www.theycallmeHER.com
t h e y
+
"Is not the most erotic portion of a body where the garment gapes? …It is this flash itself which seduces."

Roland Barthes

For the record, I support Miley Cyrus’ style evolution and her penchant for shade, but she requires an education on “sexiness” as it relates to performance and her onstage persona. There are so many examples of recording artists executing effortless “sexy.” There’s this. And this. And this. And this.

Those artists understand both the capabilities and the limitations of their natural movement and they dance accordingly. And more importantly, as Cher stated rather plainly, Miley’s performance just wasn’t good. She could have slapped a newborn while smoking a crack pipe and if the performance was stellar, no one would have cared. In fact, we would have all lined up to slap a child in the name of Miley awesome.

But it wasn’t.

So we cringed.

"The greatest performers, like Madonna in a canonical video such as “Vogue,” know how to use suggestion and mystery to project the magic of sexual allure. Miley, go back to school!" - TIME

Unless, of course, her 2013 VMA performance was meant to be playfully ironic; tauntingly kitsch. Or if she truly loves trap music, but just can’t seem to dance to the rhythm of the beat… then, well, carry on Miley. Carry on.

+
It’s Independence Day.  Salut to Frank Ocean and Anderson Cooper. Freeing themselves of societal constructs and suppressive rigidity and just living… being. 
Frank Ocean admits his ‘first love’ was a man.
Anderson Cooper “The fact is, I’m gay.”
C’est le quatrième.
+
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
Pulp fiction novels of the 30s, 40s, and 50s were the progressive, some times fantastical, and at times kitsch creative renderings of the repressed American. These hyper-popular escapist texts gave voice to unspoken truths otherwise censured by a puritanic culture. 
+
The Transformation of Tiresias
+
Catherine Deneuve in Belle de Jour. 1967.
Film was more daring… then… and abroad. This exploration of perversion is reminiscent of Le Balcon. Another goodie. 
+
post Whitney.
+
Smart girls do drugs, says science.